Specialization

Course Descriptions

Inland Immigration Law Specialist

INL 100 – Introduction to Immigration Policy and Practice

Course Description:
Introduction to the history of Canadian immigration, its legal and political framework, legislation, immigration categories, working with clients and social technology tools useful to your practice.

This course will enable you to:
  • Define commonly used legal immigration terminology.
  • Make connections between the history of Canadian immigration and its present.
  • Identify and use commonly used research tools.
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the legal and political framework.
  • Identify and briefly explain the major categories and classes of immigration.
  • Explain, at a basic level, the Provincial Nominee Programs and Quebec immigration.
  • Use traditional and electronic research methods to access, evaluate and summarize reference material.

INL 102 – Family Class

Course Description:
Identify Family Class immigration applicants and complete the application using case studies. Determine requirements for a Sponsor, Spouse or Common-Law Partner and how to apply the Low-income Cut-off.

This course will enable you to:
  • Identify, define and use family class immigration terminology.
  • Locate and utilize resources and electronic forms.
  • Identify family class members and determine applicant admissibility in family, spouse or common-law partner classes.
  • Identify criteria and conditions for immigrating to Canada under family class category.
  • Define sponsor and determine requirements for submitting sponsorship application.
  • Identify criteria and conditions for becoming a permanent resident in spouse or common-law partner class.
  • Identify criteria and conditions for Humanitarian and Compassionate application for member of family class.
  • Apply selection criteria to applicant in order to determine eligibility under family class, spouse or common-law partner class.
  • Apply selection criteria to applicant cases to determine eligibility and provide detailed rationale to support case strategy.
  • Identify, locate and complete required documentation for all types of family class applications.
  • Apply your developing case strategy processes to evaluate realistic client scenarios.
  • Present case recommendations for evaluation by faculty and peers.

INL 104 – Appeals, Admissibility Hearings and Detentions

Course Description:
Process of admissibility hearings, examinations, appeals and detention reviews. Identify those alleged to be inadmissible and procedures to follow until issuance of a removal order or admission or right to remain in Canada. Learn about: removal orders, process of appeal to Immigration Appeal Board and to Federal Court. How to conduct detention reviews.

This course will enable you to:
  • Identify, define and use appeals and hearings terminology.
  • Locate and utilize appropriate resources and electronic forms.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of: examinations, detention reviews, admissibility hearings, Immigration Appeal Division appeals.
  • Distinguish between Canada Border Services Agency, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (Immigration Division), and Immigration Appeal Division (Refugee Board).
  • Identify those alleged to be inadmissible to Canada and provide appropriate advice and options to applicants who may be impacted.
  • Determine validity and substance of an admissibility hearing report.
  • Understand procedures related to inadmissibility that may result in removal orders, entry to Canada and right to remain in Canada.
  • Understand and apply knowledge regarding removal orders, process and results of an appeal to Immigration Appeal Board.
  • Advise clients regarding appeals that may be directed to Federal Court and possible outcomes.
  • Conduct a detention review and understand legal procedures involved.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of rules of evidence and how to apply them to admissibility hearings and detention reviews.
  • Distinguish between four types of appeals to the Immigration Appeal Division, comprehensively outline appeal process and advise on refusals.
  • Apply strategy processes to evaluate realistic client scenarios.
  • Present case recommendations for evaluation by faculty and peers.

INL 105 – Refugee Class

Course Description:
How to save lives and offer protection to the persecuted and stateless using case studies. Learn how to handle a client refugee claim. Lead a typical refugee claimant through client interviews to determine status, prepare documentation and a client for hearings and appeals, present evidence and testimony and examine and prepare rebuttal arguments.

This course will enable you to:
  • Identify, define and use refugee class terminology.
  • Locate and utilize resources and electronic forms.
  • Describe process for a refugee claim, including pertinent timelines and restrictions.
  • Determine if a client meets the criteria to be considered a Protected Person.
  • Prepare the Personal Information Form, client narrative and other required applications and procedures.
  • Prepare all oral and written submissions for a client.
  • Verify a client’s claim using outside references and a history of client’s homeland and current political climate.
  • Prepare client and witnesses for a hearing and a discussion of evidence.
  • Present evidence and testimony in an orderly fashion to Panel Member appointed by Refugee Board.
  • Demonstrate techniques of examination and prepare rebuttal arguments.
  • Advise a client, if a finding of the Refugee Panel is negative, as to steps available under Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, together with any time periods or limits for such actions.

Hearings and Appeals Immigration Law Specialist

APP 100 – Introduction to Immigration Policy and Practice

Course Description:
Introduction to the history of Canadian immigration, its legal and political framework, legislation, immigration categories, working with clients and social technology tools useful to your practice.

This course will enable you to:
  • Define commonly used legal immigration terminology.
  • Make connections between the history of Canadian immigration and its present.
  • Identify and use commonly used research tools.
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the legal and political framework.
  • Identify and briefly explain the major categories and classes of immigration.
  • Explain, at a basic level, the Provincial Nominee Programs and Quebec immigration.
  • Use traditional and electronic research methods to access, evaluate and summarize reference material.

APP 104 – Appeals, Admissibility Hearings and Detentions

Course Description:
Process of admissibility hearings, examinations, appeals and detention reviews. Identify those alleged to be inadmissible and procedures to follow until issuance of a removal order or admission or right to remain in Canada. Learn about: removal orders, process of appeal to Immigration Appeal Board and to Federal Court. How to conduct detention reviews.

This course will enable you to:
  • Identify, define and use appeals and hearings terminology.
  • Locate and utilize appropriate resources and electronic forms.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of: examinations, detention reviews, admissibility hearings, Immigration Appeal Division appeals.
  • Distinguish between Canada Border Services Agency, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (Immigration Division), and Immigration Appeal Division (Refugee Board).
  • Identify those alleged to be inadmissible to Canada and provide appropriate advice and options to applicants who may be impacted.
  • Determine validity and substance of an admissibility hearing report.
  • Understand procedures related to inadmissibility that may result in removal orders, entry to Canada and right to remain in Canada.
  • Understand and apply knowledge regarding removal orders, process and results of an appeal to Immigration Appeal Board.
  • Advise clients regarding appeals that may be directed to Federal Court and possible outcomes.
  • Conduct a detention review and understand legal procedures involved.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of rules of evidence and how to apply them to admissibility hearings and detention reviews.
  • Distinguish between four types of appeals to the Immigration Appeal Division, comprehensively outline appeal process and advise on refusals.
  • Apply strategy processes to evaluate realistic client scenarios.
  • Present case recommendations for evaluation by faculty and peers.

APP 105 – Refugee Class

Course Description:
How to save lives and offer protection to the persecuted and stateless using case studies. Learn how to handle a client refugee claim. Lead a typical refugee claimant through client interviews to determine status, prepare documentation and a client for hearings and appeals, present evidence and testimony and examine and prepare rebuttal arguments.

This course will enable you to:
  • Identify, define and use refugee class terminology.
  • Locate and utilize resources and electronic forms.
  • Describe process for a refugee claim, including pertinent timelines and restrictions.
  • Determine if a client meets the criteria to be considered a Protected Person.
  • Prepare the Personal Information Form, client narrative and other required applications and procedures.
  • Prepare all oral and written submissions for a client.
  • Verify a client’s claim using outside references and a history of client’s homeland and current political climate.
  • Prepare client and witnesses for a hearing and a discussion of evidence.
  • Present evidence and testimony in an orderly fashion to Panel Member appointed by Refugee Board.
  • Demonstrate techniques of examination and prepare rebuttal arguments.
  • Advise a client, if a finding of the Refugee Panel is negative, as to steps available under Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, together with any time periods or limits for such actions.

Overseas Immigration Law Specialist

OVER 100 – Introduction to Immigration Policy and Practice

Course Description:
Introduction to the history of Canadian immigration, its legal and political framework, legislation, immigration categories, working with clients and social technology tools useful to your practice.

This course will enable you to:
  • Define commonly used legal immigration terminology.
  • Make connections between the history of Canadian immigration and its present.
  • Identify and use commonly used research tools.
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the legal and political framework.
  • Identify and briefly explain the major categories and classes of immigration.
  • Explain, at a basic level, the Provincial Nominee Programs and Quebec immigration.
  • Use traditional and electronic research methods to access, evaluate and summarize reference material.

OVER 101 – Economic Class

Course Description:
Categories of economic migration. Federal and Provincial skilled workers (including Quebec), Federal immigration business class categories of entrepreneurs, investors, self-employed persons and Provincial Nominee business classes (including Quebec).

This course will enable you to:
  • Identify, define and use economic immigration class terminology.
  • Locate and utilize resources and electronic forms.
  • Determine admissibility for an economic class applicant.
  • Explain criteria and conditions for eligibility for all economic class applicants.
  • Apply research skills to access sources and tools to verify criteria and eligibility for program application.
  • Apply selection criteria to specified case scenarios and develop a case strategy.
  • Identify required documents and methods to obtain them.
  • Identify inadmissibility issues and apply processes and procedures to overcome them.
  • Identify and apply residency obligation criteria specific to permanent residence.
  • Describe and discuss changing legislative policies that impact economic class immigration.
  • Describe and apply your case strategy process – from information gathering and research to client advisement.
  • Present case recommendations for evaluation by faculty and peers.

OVER 102 – Family Class

Course Description:
Identify Family Class immigration applicants and complete the application using case studies. Determine requirements for a Sponsor, Spouse or Common-Law Partner and how to apply the Low-income Cut-off.

This course will enable you to:
  • Identify, define and use family class immigration terminology.
  • Locate and utilize resources and electronic forms.
  • Identify family class members and determine applicant admissibility in family, spouse or common-law partner classes.
  • Identify criteria and conditions for immigrating to Canada under family class category.
  • Define sponsor and determine requirements for submitting sponsorship application.
  • Identify criteria and conditions for becoming a permanent resident in spouse or common-law partner class.
  • Identify criteria and conditions for Humanitarian and Compassionate application for member of family class.
  • Apply selection criteria to applicant in order to determine eligibility under family class, spouse or common-law partner class.
  • Apply selection criteria to applicant cases to determine eligibility and provide detailed rationale to support case strategy.
  • Identify, locate and complete required documentation for all types of family class applications.
  • Apply your developing case strategy processes to evaluate realistic client scenarios.
  • Present case recommendations for evaluation by faculty and peers.

OVER 103 – Temporary Class

Course Description:
Temporary immigration categories: work, study and visit. Determine admissibility and eligibility of applicant under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations and Policy Manuals. Apply criteria to obtain permanent residence or Canadian Citizenship.

This course will enable you to:
  • Identify, define and use temporary immigration class terminology.
  • Locate and utilize resources and electronic forms.
  • Explain and apply process for determining admissibility.
  • Explain and apply process for determining eligibility of an applicant for skilled worker migration.
  • Demonstrate and apply knowledge of criteria and conditions an applicant must meet to work, study or visit Canada.
  • Source, identify and apply selection criteria for permanent resident and citizenship applications.
  • Source, identify and complete required documentation for an application for temporary entry and status.
  • Assess and explain impact of international agreements on eligibility to work in Canada.
  • Prepare and submit applications for: work, study and visitor status, criminal re-habilitation, extensions, changes to terms and conditions, live-in caregiver, re-instatement and temporary residence.
  • Apply case strategy processes to evaluate realistic client scenarios.
  • Present case recommendations for evaluation by faculty and peers.

Business Immigration Law Specialist

BUS 100 – Introduction to Immigration Policy and Practice

Course Description:
Introduction to the history of Canadian immigration, its legal and political framework, legislation, immigration categories, working with clients and social technology tools useful to your practice.

This course will enable you to:
  • Define commonly used legal immigration terminology.
  • Make connections between the history of Canadian immigration and its present.
  • Identify and use commonly used research tools.
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the legal and political framework.
  • Identify and briefly explain the major categories and classes of immigration.
  • Explain, at a basic level, the Provincial Nominee Programs and Quebec immigration.
  • Use traditional and electronic research methods to access, evaluate and summarize reference material.

BUS 101 – Economic Class Extract

Course Description:
Categories of economic business immigration. Federal immigration business class categories of investors, and self-employed persons; Provincial Nominee business streams; Quebec self employed, entrepreneurs and investors.

This course will enable you to:
  • Identify, define and use economic immigration class terminology specific to the business streams.
  • Locate and utilize resources and electronic forms.
  • Determine admissibility for an economic class business applicants.
  • Explain criteria and conditions for eligibility for business economic class applicants.
  • Apply research skills to access sources and tools to verify criteria and eligibility for program application.
  • Apply selection criteria to specified case scenarios and develop a case strategy.
  • Identify required documents and methods to obtain them.
  • Identify inadmissibility issues and apply processes and procedures to overcome them.
  • Identify and apply residency obligation criteria specific to permanent residence.
  • Describe and discuss changing legislative policies that impact business economic class immigration.
  • Describe and apply your case strategy process – from information gathering and research to client advisement.
  • Present case recommendations for evaluation by faculty and peers.

BUS 103 – Temporary Class - business focus

Course Description:
Temporary immigration categories: business work permits and business visitor visas. Determine admissibility and eligibility of applicant under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations and Policy Manuals.

This course will enable you to:
  • Identify, define and use temporary immigration class terminology specific to business applicants.
  • Locate and utilize resources and electronic forms.
  • Explain and apply process for determining admissibility for temporary entry by a business applicant.
  • Explain and apply process for determining eligibility of an applicant for a business work permit.
  • Demonstrate and apply knowledge of criteria and conditions a business applicant must meet to work or visit Canada.
  • Source, identify and complete required documentation for an application for temporary entry and status.
  • Assess and explain impact of international agreements on eligibility to work in Canada as a business person.
  • Prepare and submit applications for: business work permits and business visitor status, criminal re-habilitation, extensions, changes to terms and conditions, re-instatement.
  • Apply case strategy processes to evaluate realistic client scenarios.
  • Present case recommendations for evaluation by faculty and peers.

Economic Immigration Law Specialist

ECON 100 – Introduction to Immigration Policy and Practice

Course Description:
Introduction to the history of Canadian immigration, its legal and political framework, legislation, immigration categories, working with clients and social technology tools useful to your practice.

This course will enable you to:
  • Define commonly used legal immigration terminology.
  • Make connections between the history of Canadian immigration and its present.
  • Identify and use commonly used research tools.
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the legal and political framework.
  • Identify and briefly explain the major categories and classes of immigration.
  • Explain, at a basic level, the Provincial Nominee Programs and Quebec immigration.
  • Use traditional and electronic research methods to access, evaluate and summarize reference material.

ECON 101 – Economic Class

Course Description:
Categories of economic migration. Federal, Quebec and Provincial Nominated skilled workers, Federal immigration business class categories of investors and self-employed persons, Provincial Nominee business streams, Quebec self employed, entrepreneur and investor categories.

This course will enable you to:
  • Identify, define and use economic immigration class terminology.
  • Locate and utilize resources and electronic forms.
  • Determine admissibility for an economic class applicant.
  • Explain criteria and conditions for eligibility for all economic class applicants.
  • Apply research skills to access sources and tools to verify criteria and eligibility for program application.
  • Apply selection criteria to specified case scenarios and develop a case strategy.
  • Identify required documents and methods to obtain them.
  • Identify inadmissibility issues and apply processes and procedures to overcome them.
  • Identify and apply residency obligation criteria specific to permanent residence.
  • Describe and discuss changing legislative policies that impact economic class immigration.
  • Describe and apply your case strategy process – from information gathering and research to client advisement.
  • Present case recommendations for evaluation by faculty and peers.

ECON 103 – Temporary Class

Course Description:
Temporary immigration categories: work, study and visit. Determine admissibility and eligibility of applicant under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations and Policy Manuals. Apply criteria to obtain permanent residence or Canadian Citizenship.


This course will enable you to:
  • Identify, define and use temporary immigration class terminology.
  • Locate and utilize resources and electronic forms.
  • Explain and apply process for determining admissibility.
  • Explain and apply process for determining eligibility of an applicant for skilled worker migration.
  • Demonstrate and apply knowledge of criteria and conditions an applicant must meet to work, study or visit Canada.
  • Source, identify and apply selection criteria for permanent resident and citizenship applications.
  • Source, identify and complete required documentation for an application for temporary entry and status.
  • Assess and explain impact of international agreements on eligibility to work in Canada.
  • Prepare and submit applications for: work, study and visitor status, criminal re-habilitation, extensions, changes to terms and conditions, live-in caregiver, re-instatement and temporary residence.
  • Apply case strategy processes to evaluate realistic client scenarios.
  • Present case recommendations for evaluation by faculty and peers.

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“e-Academy prepares students for the ever-changing Canadian immigration landscape.”
Nigel Thomson
Bellingham, Washington,
Providing immigration consulting services since 1991.